Trump regime proposes zero aid to Tibetans in 2018

US President Donald Trump has proposed zero Tibetan aid in the year 2018, US policy investment has declined to provide financial assistance to the community to preserve its distinct identity.

Trump administration now wants other countries to enter.

The State Department, which sent a detailed proposal to Congress as part of the first annual budget of M. Trump, described as one of the “difficult decisions” to do so, since the budget itself was reduced by more than 28%.

Leaders of the Tibetan community in the United States abstained from commenting on the issue saying they always read the budget documents. At the same time, it was noted that the majority of assistance to the Tibetan people, including Tibet, which was previously led by Congress. Democratic leader Nancy Pelosi has expressed concern about the movement.

“Leader Pelosi is very concerned about zeroing aid to the Tibetan community in the Trump budget bill,” said Ms. Pti. Drew Hammill, Pelosi’s spokesman.

Pelosi, who started this month, led a high-level delegation of Congress in Dharamshala to meet the Dalai Lama, was concerned about development.

“As has been said many times, even during this month’s visit to the Dalai Lama in Dharamsala, if the United States does not appear to be human rights in China, all moral authority is lost to talk about the whole world,” Mr. Hammill told PTI.

“This includes critical funding through the State Department for meaningful efforts, such as those that support a truly autonomous Tibet, that promote and protect US interests in the world,” said M. Hammill in response to a question.

The State Department, in its budget proposal for fiscal year 2018 beginning on October 1, the Fund withdrew decades Tibet and proposed a null against Fellows Ngwang Choephel. The two categories in 2017 and 2016 accounted for more than one million dollars.

However, the State Department, in its footnote, said that special academic exchanges, including budget allocation has been reduced from more than 14.7 million in 2017 to only 7 billion for 2018 include Funding programs such as the Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship Program, Mobility (Disability) Scholarships and the Tibetan Fund. “As we work to streamline efforts to ensure the effectiveness and efficiency of US taxpayer dollars, we recognize that we must prioritize and make difficult decisions,” said the State Department official in the PTI.

“By focusing our efforts, we will be able to advance our most important policy objectives and national security interests, while ensuring that other donor countries contribute their fair share of global challenges,” said the official, who asked for anonymity.

However, the official did not identify the countries that want to help continue to finance the Tibetan cause.

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